“NOTHING IN THE WORLD SMELLS AS AUTHENTIC, COMFORTING AND BRINGS BACK CHERISHED MEMORIES OF FAMILY AND FRIENDS, HOME AND GREAT FOOD THAN
THE LATE SUMMER ROASTING OF NEW MEXICO CHILE.”
–VICTOR, 12TH GENERATION NEW MEXICAN

Attention: NMCA Members

All NMCA Members receive unlimited access to the Western Growers resource library.

About Western Growers:
Founded in 1926, Western Growers Association represents local and regional family farmers growing fresh produce in Arizona, California and Colorado. Their members and their workers provide over half the nation's fresh fruits, vegetables and tree nuts, including nearly half of America's fresh organic produce. Some members also farm throughout the U.S. and in other countries so people have year-round access to nutritious food.

Recipe picture

RECIPE SPOTLIGHT

Courtesy of Bueno Foods

Nutrition and Food Science

Useful chile pepper preparation information can be found at the NMSU Chile Pepper Institute.

Chile is so important to New Mexico, our state question is:

chili_peppers_baskets_green_red

RED
or
GREEN?

The common question of "Red or Green?" when ordering cuisine at New Mexico restaurants refers to whether the diner prefers red or green chile.  Green chile turns red and has a sweeter flavor after it ripens.  Those who love New Mexico cuisine have definite opinions as to which flavor they prefer.  If a combination of the two flavors is ordered, it is known as "Christmas".

 

The New Mexico State Legislature passed a House Joint Memorial in 1999,  declaring "Red or Green?" as the official state question.  This measure was passed to signify the importance the chile industry has on the economy of the state.  With the adoption of this state question, New Mexico is acknowledging the financial gain and national recognition that chile generates for the state.

Why is New Mexico Chile So Good?

New Mexico chile – of all varieties – are especially desired and sought after worldwide.   This is because our climate, soils and decades of farming knowledge and practices passed down through generations – growers to growers – has resulted in a uniquely satisfying fruit.

  • 350 days of sunshine!

  • Chile craves warm, dry weather and warm soil which is in abundance in New Mexico.

  • Varieties are chosen with the New Mexico climate, soils and agricultural practices in mind.

CHILE IS GOOD FOR YOU!

We thank our friends at the Chile Institute for the nutritional information.